Recent Publications - LA/ER Injectable Therapy

Structural and pharmacological evaluation of a novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as a promising long acting nanoformulation for treating HIV

Date: 
4/30/19
Citation: 

Kudalkar SN, Ullah I, Bertoletti N, et al. Structural and pharmacological evaluation of a novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as a promising long acting nanoformulation for treating HIV. Antiviral Res. 2019;167:110-116. doi:10.1016/j.antiviral.2019.04.010. PMID: 31034849; PMCID: PMC6554724.

Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been proven effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and has significantly improved the health outcomes in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. The therapeutic benefits of cART have been challenged because of the toxicity and emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains along with lifelong patient compliance resulting in non-adherence.

Semi-solid prodrug nanoparticles for long-acting delivery of water-soluble antiretroviral drugs within combination HIV therapies

Date: 
4/1/19
Citation: 

Hobson JJ, Al-khouja A, Curley P, et al. Semi-solid prodrug nanoparticles for long-acting delivery of water-soluble antiretroviral drugs within combination HIV therapies. Nature Communications. 2019 Mar;10:1413. PMID: 30926773; PMCID: PMC6441007.

The increasing global prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is estimated at 36.7 million people currently infected. Lifelong antiretroviral (ARV) drug combination dosing allows management as a chronic condition by suppressing circulating viral load to allow for a near-normal life; however, the daily burden of oral administration may lead to non-adherence and drug resistance development.

Long-Acting Injectable Antiretroviral Treatment Acceptability and Preferences: A Qualitative Study Among US Providers, Adults Living with HIV, and Parents of Youth Living with HIV

Date: 
3/15/19
Citation: 

Simoni JM, Beima-Sofie K, Mohamed ZH, Christodoulou J, Tapia K, Graham SM, Ho R, Collier AC. Long-Acting Injectable Antiretroviral Treatment Acceptability and Preferences: A Qualitative Study Among US Providers, Adults Living with HIV, and Parents of Youth Living with HIV. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2019 Mar;33(3):104-111. doi: 10.1089/apc.2018.0198. PMID: 30844308; PMCID: PMC6442271.

To better understand acceptability of long-acting injectable antiretroviral treatment (LAI-ART) regimens for HIV management, we conducted seven semi-structured focus group discussions with experienced HIV care providers and persons living with HIV (PLWH) and five individual interviews with parents of children living with HIV in the western United States. Although providers were wary about a potential negative impact on consistent engagement in care, they predicted that patients, especially those with adherence challenges, would be enthusiastic about LAI options. Many PLWH, especially young adults, welcomed the option of an LAI-ART regimen; however, others feared injections and expressed concerns about possible side effects, dosing more frequent than every 2 weeks, additional costs, and lower efficacy. 

The Invisible Product: Preferences for Sustained-Release, Long-Acting Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV Among South African Youth

Date: 
3/14/19
Citation: 

Montgomery ET, Atujuna M, Krogstad E, et al. The Invisible Product: Preferences for Sustained-Release, Long-Acting Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV Among South African Youth. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2019 Apr 15;80(5):542-550. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001960. PMID: 30865050; PMCID: PMC6426447.

Long-acting injectable and implantable approaches aim to overcome some of the documented challenges with uptake and adherence to current HIV prevention methods. Youth are a key end-user population for these methods. We used qualitative methods to examine product attributes and preferences for current and future long-acting HIV prevention approaches.

Predicting drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine using PBPK modelling

Date: 
12/19/18
Citation: 

Rajoli RKR, Curley P, Chiong J, et al. Predicting drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and long-acting cabotegravir and rilpivirine using PBPK modelling. J Infect Dis. 2019 May 5;219(11):1735-1742. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy726. PMID: 30566691; PMCID: PMC6500558.

Cabotegravir and rilpivirine are two long-acting (LA) ARVs that can be administered intramuscularly (IM); their interaction with rifampicin, a first-line anti-TB agent, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to simulate and predict DDIs between these LA ARV agents and rifampicin using PBPK modelling.

Modelling the long-acting administration of anti-tuberculosis agents using PBPK: a proof of concept study

Date: 
8/17/18
Citation: 

Rajoli RKR, PodanyAT, Moss DM, et al. Modelling the long-acting administration of anti-tuberculosis agents using PBPK: a proof of concept study. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2018 Aug 1;22(8):937-944. PMID: 29991405; PMCID: PMC6166436.

SETTING:
Anti-tuberculosis formulations necessitate uninterrupted treatment to cure tuberculosis (TB), but are characterised by suboptimal adherence, which jeopardises therapeutic efficacy. Long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations or implants could address these associated issues.

OBJECTIVE:
niazid, rifapentine, bedaquiline and delamanid—in adults for treatment for latent tuberculous infection (LTBI).

Recent developments of nanotherapeutics for targeted and long-acting, combination HIV chemotherapy

Date: 
8/14/18
Citation: 

Gao Y, Kraft JC, Yu D, Ho RJY.  Recent developments of nanotherapeutics for targeted and long-acting, combination HIV chemotherapy. Eur J Pharm Biopharm. 2019 May;138:75-91. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpb.2018.04.014. Epub 2018 Apr 17. PMID: 29678735; PMCID: PMC6482852.

Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) given orally has transformed HIV from a terminal illness to a manageable chronic disease. Yet despite the recent development of newer and more potent drugs for cART and suppression of virus in blood to undetectable levels, residual virus remains in tissues.

Long-acting formulations for the treatment of latent tuberculous infection: opportunities and challenges

Date: 
2/15/18
Citation: 

Swindells S, Siccardi M, Barrett SE, et al. Long-acting formulations for the treatment of latent tuberculous infection: opportunities and challenges. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2018 Feb 1; 22(2): 125–132. PMID: 29506608; PMCID: PMC6103451.

Long-acting/extended-release drug formulations have proved very successful in diverse areas of medicine, including contraception, psychiatry and, most recently, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Though challenging, application of this technology to anti-tuberculosis treatment could have substantial impact. 

Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic (MBPK) models describe the complex plasma kinetics of three antiretrovirals delivered by a long-acting anti-HIV drug combination nanoparticle formulation.

Date: 
2/12/18
Citation: 

Kraft JC, Treuting PM, Ho RJY. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic (MBPK) models describe the complex plasma kinetics of three antiretrovirals delivered by a long-acting anti-HIV drug combination nanoparticle formulation. J Control Release. 2018 Apr 10;275:229-241. doi: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2018.02.003. Epub 2018 Feb 10. PMID: 29432823; PMCID: PMC5878144.

Existing oral antiretroviral (ARV) agents have been shown in human studies to exhibit limited lymph node penetration and lymphatic drug insufficiency. As lymph nodes are a reservoir of HIV, it is critical to deliver and sustain effective levels of ARV combinations in these tissues. To overcome lymph node drug insufficiency of oral combination ARV therapy (cART), we developed and reported a long-acting and lymphocyte-targeting injectable that contains three ARVs-hydrophobic lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV), and hydrophilic tenofovir (TFV)-stabilized by lipid excipients in a nanosuspension.

Creation of a nanoformulated cabotegravir prodrug with improved antiretroviral profiles

Date: 
1/15/18
Citation: 

Zhou T, Su H, Dash P, et al. Creation of a nanoformulated cabotegravir prodrug with improved antiretroviral profiles. Biomaterials. 2018;151:53-65. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2017.10.023. PMID: 29059541; PMCID: PMC5926202.

Long-acting parenteral (LAP) antiretroviral drugs have generated considerable interest for treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. One new LAP is cabotegravir (CAB), a highly potent integrase inhibitor, with a half-life of up to 54 days, allowing for every other month parenteral administrations. Despite this excellent profile, high volume dosing, injection site reactions and low body fluid drug concentrations affect broad use for virus infected and susceptible people.

Pages